/ by Sarah Jamison

   Peter Henry Emerson’s (1856 – 1936) photographs are early examples of promoting photography as an art form. In 1885 he was involved in the formation of the Camera Club of London, and the following year he was elected to the Council of the Photographic Society and abandoned his career as a surgeon to become a photographer and writer. In 1889 he published a controversial and influential book, “Naturalistic Photography for Students of the Art”, in which he explained his philosophy of art and straightforward photography. He claimed that photography should be seen as a genre of its own, not one that seeks to imitate other art forms. His theories on photography are still a strong influence on how photography is taught today.

Peter Henry Emerson’s (1856 – 1936) photographs are early examples of promoting photography as an art form. In 1885 he was involved in the formation of the Camera Club of London, and the following year he was elected to the Council of the Photographic Society and abandoned his career as a surgeon to become a photographer and writer. In 1889 he published a controversial and influential book, “Naturalistic Photography for Students of the Art”, in which he explained his philosophy of art and straightforward photography. He claimed that photography should be seen as a genre of its own, not one that seeks to imitate other art forms. His theories on photography are still a strong influence on how photography is taught today.