/ by Sarah Jamison

  Anne Wardrope (Nott) Brigman (1869–1950) was an American photographer and one of the original members of the Photo-Secession movement in America. She began photographing in 1901. Soon she was exhibiting in local photographic salons, and within two years she had developed a reputation as a master of pictorial photography. In late 1902 she came across a copy of Camera Work and was captivated by the images and the writings of Alfred Stieglitz. She wrote Stieglitz praising him for the journal, and Stieglitz in turn soon became captivated with Brigman’s photography. In 1906 she was listed as a Fellow of the Photo-Secession, the only photographer west of the Mississippi to be honored. In 1908 the Secession Club held a special exhibit for her photographs in New York, and in 1909 she won a gold medal in the Alaska-Yukon Exposition as well as awards in Europe. Brigman often featured herself as the subject of her images,and after shooting the photographs, she would extensively touch up the negatives with paints, pencil, or superimposition. Brigman’s deliberately counter-cultural images suggested bohemianism and female liberation. Her work challenged the establishment’s cultural norms and defied convention, by embracing pagan antiquity. The raw emotional intensity and strength of her photos contrasted with the carefully calculated and composed images of Stieglitz and other modern photographers.

Anne Wardrope (Nott) Brigman (1869–1950) was an American photographer and one of the original members of the Photo-Secession movement in America. She began photographing in 1901. Soon she was exhibiting in local photographic salons, and within two years she had developed a reputation as a master of pictorial photography. In late 1902 she came across a copy of Camera Work and was captivated by the images and the writings of Alfred Stieglitz. She wrote Stieglitz praising him for the journal, and Stieglitz in turn soon became captivated with Brigman’s photography. In 1906 she was listed as a Fellow of the Photo-Secession, the only photographer west of the Mississippi to be honored. In 1908 the Secession Club held a special exhibit for her photographs in New York, and in 1909 she won a gold medal in the Alaska-Yukon Exposition as well as awards in Europe. Brigman often featured herself as the subject of her images,and after shooting the photographs, she would extensively touch up the negatives with paints, pencil, or superimposition. Brigman’s deliberately counter-cultural images suggested bohemianism and female liberation. Her work challenged the establishment’s cultural norms and defied convention, by embracing pagan antiquity. The raw emotional intensity and strength of her photos contrasted with the carefully calculated and composed images of Stieglitz and other modern photographers.